The Iraqi parliament in Baghdad stormed to denounce the appointment of a new prime minister

The Iraqi parliament in Baghdad stormed to denounce the appointment of a new prime minister

In a video published by the New York Times,We see hundreds of men gathering in front of the so-called Green Zone. It is a very safe area of ​​the capital where embassies and government authorities are located. In front of the large surrounding walls, protesters wave pictures of Muqtada al-Sadr, the Iraqi Shiite cleric they support and want to see as prime minister, rather than the just-appointed Sudanese Muhammed Shea.

Then these revolutionaries demolish huge parts of the walls and managed to enter the Green Zone, and then the Parliament building. In New York Times footage, they are first seen in the lobby waving Iraqi flags, singing and dancing. They then join the bicycle as they sit and lie on the desks of the legislators who were absent at the time of this intrusion.

Amid the crowd, one protester said it was “against the corrupt officials in power”, Al-Monitor Reports, a news website dedicated to the Middle East and created in the United States. Shiite leader Muqtada al-Sadr addressed his supporters on Twitter, saying: “Your message has been heard. You have terrorized the corrupt.” He then called on them to leave Parliament, which the protesters did about two hours after the start of the storming.

The appointment of the new prime minister sparked outrage among Muqtada al-Sadr’s supporters

But Muqtada al-Sadr emerged victorious from the legislative elections last October. As the BBC remembers, But after eight months he did not succeed in forming a government. At the head of the first political force in the Iraqi parliament, he later ordered his 73 deputies to resign at the beginning of June.

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In an impasse, the Shiite coalition that dominates the Iraqi parliament finally chose, on Monday 25 July, a candidate for the post of prime minister. This is Mohamed Shea Al-Sudani, the former minister of human rights, trade or even work. This former provincial governor has been described In the Lebanese daily Orient Le Jour As “coming from Seraglio as a candidate for the alliance of Shiite factions loyal to Iran.”

Other than the protest that followed this appointment, the country is not ready to break the political deadlock

It is also awaiting the appointment of its president, which is another sticking point. As the Al Monitor website explains,, The tradition wants her to be a Kurdish figure, but at the moment, the two major historical Kurdish parties have not succeeded in reaching an agreement. The PDK party supports the Minister of Interior of the Kurdistan Region, Reber Ahmed, and for its part, the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan wants to renew the mandate of the current president, Barham Salih.

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According to Al-Monitor, the Shiite alliance that just appointed the prime minister could once again play a major role and put pressure on the two Kurdish parties until they reach an agreement.

In Sri Lanka, Parliament has just voted to extend the state of emergency

Despite criticism from the opposition, it will remain in place until mid-August. This state of emergency allows the military to arrest people, limit public gatherings, and search private property, The British newspaper The Guardian explains. It was the interim president, Ranil Wickremesinghe, who issued it on July 17. He had then promised a “severe” response to the rioters, ie those who organized the demonstrations which led to the resignation of President Rajapaksa.

Two activists, in particular, were arrested on Wednesday 27 July due to an illegal gathering, according to the police. reported by Al Jazeera. The day before, student leader Daniz Ali was arrested while boarding a plane bound for Dubai. In the previous week, the police had already demolished the main anti-government protest camp in the capital. During this intervention, the demonstrators were beaten, which provoked many reactions. The Guardian cited Amnesty International as an example. The NGO had called on the Sri Lankan authorities to respect the opposition. For the head of the Sri Lanka Bar Association, this will damage the first class and its international image.

These tensions in society are adding to a widespread economic crisis for Sri Lanka.

Already 22 million people have endured long months without electricity, food or sky-high prices, and today, Qatar’s Al Jazeera media channel asserts, the country is bankrupt. It has also halted repayment of its external loans amounting to $51 billion, although more than half of this amount must be paid by 2027. So the government announced that it is preparing a debt restructuring plan, which is necessary to negotiate a rescue plan with the International Monetary Fund.

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As for former President Rajapaksa, he is currently in exile in Singapore but according to a Sri Lankan minister Quoted from the GuardianHe can go back to the country. The British newspaper explains that human rights groups and lawyers said they pressured several countries not to accept the former head of state. The Guardian specifies that a return to Sri Lanka could be synonymous with Rajapaksa’s legal action, whether for corruption or war crimes, facts going back ten years.

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